Pura lead dot 1

Toxic levels of lead found in stainless steel water bottles. Are you, or your child, using these water bottles?

naturalbabymama@hotmail.com Baby, Family, Kids, Lead, Sippy Cups, Toxins, Water bottles, Water Bottles 193 Comments

Trying to find an alternative to plastic, a lot of people buy stainless steel water bottles thinking this is a safer choice for for both them and their children.  Shockingly some of my readers found high levels, up to 100% lead, in parts of their insulated stainless steel water bottles.  Recently I, along with some readers, decided to test items we owned for lead.  We hired Tamara Rubin, lead-poisoning prevention advocate, to test some household items with an XRF.  She is certified and approved to use these machines.

Lead is a neurotoxin that causes permanent brain damage.  Children are even more susceptible to lead exposure and it has lifelong negative effects.  Lead in children’s products can not be more than 90ppm.   

The findings shocking findings are below:

PlanetBox Insulated Water Bottle:

The dot on the bottom of the PlanetBox insulated water bottle tested for 660,000ppm lead!  This was used by a child whose hand were touching and holding the bottom of that water bottle.  Children put their hands in their mouth all the time.  Lead exposure from the bottom of this water bottle straight into the mouth of a child is a huge risk that needs to be taken seriously.

From the PlanetBox website: “Our products are independently certified to be safe from lead, phthalates, BPA and other toxic chemicals.”

This water bottle has a plastic base that when on covers this dot.  However, it is not fully contained and exposure still could happen with he plastic bottom on.  Also, many parents have reported that they use this water bottle without the plastic base.

PlantBox has been notified of this issue as well as the CPSC.

Update: I spent about 45 minutes on the phone with the owner of Planetbox on 2/8/17.  They are taking this very seriously and are very concerned.  They have released a statement that they are in compliance with CPSC standards – which to me didn’t address the issue at hand.  Thus the reason for my phone call since being lead safe is not a standard I choose for my family.  Lead free is what I look for.  I found out during my call that compliance wasn’t their standard.  They are addressing this issue and are working non-stop with their engineering team to make better products.  I am waiting to see if their actions follow up with their words.  I don’t have an update on current products with exposed lead on the market but hope to have one soon.  

PlanetBox has issued this statement: https://www.planetbox.com/blogs/blog/a-statement-to-our-wonderful-customers-regarding-concerns-about-our-water-bottles.  I responded on my Facebook page (where they posted this) saying:

Hi Planetbox, you are aware that children & adults are using your water bottles without the removable plastic bottom. You have advised a customer who had called in to get advice on how to get a grease like substance off of the bottom of the water bottle (which was right on top of the lead solder dot) to scrub with a sponge then to make a baking soda paste to try and remove. So you recommended that a customer scrub on / around the lead solder! While she was doing this her finger nail actually removed some of the lead solder (she had no idea this was lead). You can also see from other companies that I posted a picture of that the lead solder can come off.  You state that the risk of lead is from particulate entering your body through ingestion. That is correct. What do you think might be happening when I child is holding your water bottle without the easily removable base off while they are eating? Lead solder particulate has the potential to enter their mouth directly from their hands. From your water bottle. There are alternatives to lead solder. You can make a base that isn’t removable. You also state that you did no testing of the lead solder even though you are aware of it. Why didn’t you ask the lab to test that point knowing it was a concern? Finding a safer solution and offering a recall of these bottles is what your customers want and deserve to have happen.

PlanetBox lead dot

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pura Kiki Insulated Water Bottle:

The dot on the bottom of Pura Kiki insulated water bottle tested and was 397,000ppm lead +/- 3,000.   This was used by a child that was lead poisoned living in an old home that had lead paint.  Notice how the dot is scratched off the bottom.  This dot was scratched off by the lead poisoned child.  Her mother will be testing her lead levels again after her constant exposure to this water bottle.

The great thing about Pura Kiki is that they have a silicone sippy top which makes their water bottles completely plastic free.  The lead dot is only on an older insulated bottle so buying Pura Kiki non-insulated stainless steel water bottle plus the silicone sippy top is still an option.  Pura Kiki has third party testing showing that their current product line is lead free (which I link below).

From Pura Kiki’s website “The only NONTOXIC CERTIFIED™ bottles in the world.  Pura products have been certified by an independent third party (MadeSafe.org) as NONTOXIC, and are the only such bottles on the global market to achieve this status.”

Pura Kiki has been amazingly responsive to this mom who contact them about the lead dot at the bottom of the water bottle.  I’ve been impressed and will continue to buy products from them.  Pura Kiki maintains that this water bottle should have had a metal seal covering the dot.  This mom states she did not remove the metal seal which was covering the dot.  This water bottle was an older style than what they sell now (this mom purchased in 2015).  They have testing showing that their new insulated water bottle is lead free (see below for info on their new bottle).  Pure Kiki asks if you have any questions or concerns to feel free to reach out to them directly at cs@purastainless.com.

Pura lead dot Pura lead dot 1 Pura Leaded Insulated

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Healthy Human Insulated Water Bottle: 

The dot on the bottom of this water bottle is covered by paint.  The XRF can go through materials to find what might be on the inside of items.  This dot was 100% lead.  Where this doesn’t have exposed risk, there is still lead being used from a company that claims to be lead free.  Paint can chip off and then lead would be exposed.   If you have a water bottle like this with chipping paint you should no longer be using it.

From Healthy Human’s website: “All Healthy Human products are BPA-free, Phthalate-free, and lead-free.”

Healthy Human was contacted and they maintain their products are free from lead.

Healthy Human lead

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eco Vessel Insulated Water Bottle:

16522158_10211132666646359_1905047620_o

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This was sent in by a reader.  After she read this post she tested her Eco Vessel since it had an exposed dot on the bottom.  She used an at home lead testing kit and it is positive for lead.   There was a seal that covered the lead dot but it broke off several months ago.  Her son was using this water bottle with the exposed lead.

From the Eco Vessel web site ” DO YOUR PRODUCTS CONTAIN LEAD, PHTHALATES, BPA, OR OTHER HARMFUL MATERIAL?  No.  All of our products are made without the use of harmful or leaching materials and chemicals….”

From Eco Vessel – this is an older model that they do not sell.  Even with that information the bottom cap should not come off very easily unless unusual wear and tear.  When assembled it looks like the Klean Kanteen & Yeti posted above.  They have third party tested their bottles to be safe from lead.  They adhere to European standards which are much more strict than US standards.

If you have an Eco Vessel that is intact there should be no concerned of exposure.

 

What does all of this mean? 

This seems to be an issue specifically with certain insulated stainless water bottles (not necessarily limited to only these brands).  Then to take that a step further, the insulated water bottles that don’t have a seam on the bottom.  For example, take this Klean Kanteen insulated water bottle pictured below.  It has a seam on the bottom.  I tested this exact Klean Kanteen and there was no lead.  I also tested our Yeti insulated water bottle, which has a seam on the bottom similar to the Klean Kanteen, and it was lead free as well.   Both water bottles were tested multiple places, including on the bottom where a lead dot would be if it was there.  Both were non detect for lead.  The XRF can read through some metals but I’m not 100% how far in.  There is a chance these could have the lead dot inside but from what I understand it is sealed differently.  Either way, it is totally not exposed if it happens to be there.

What is a safer option?

Any of the stainless steel water bottles below would be an excellent replacement.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What should you do?

If you are using an insulated stainless steel water bottle with exposed lead, I would immediately stop.  Do not let children touch the exposed lead.

If you have an exposed dot on the bottom of your water bottle you can test it at home with a 3M lead test swab kit.  You can buy on amazon here or they are readily available at Home Depot.   If you have a positive (or negative) result I would love to hear about at naturalbabymama@hotmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Why I’m posting this & what I hope comes of it:

First, I’m posting to bring awareness especially if children are using these bottles as it is a huge risk.  If my child was using this I would want someone to make me aware.

Second, I want these companies to take action.  Each company claims their products are lead free, which they are not.  At a minimum each of these companies should do a recall, and offer replacements, to people who have water bottles with exposed lead.  Going forward finding manufacturing processes that would allow them to cap or seal this hole without the use of lead.  Exposed lead is not safe for any child or adult!  I am confident a lead free option exists.  We have to demand safer products for both us and the workers who are making these product.

PlanetBox, Pura Kiki, Healthy Human – FOR THE SAKE OF OUR HEALTH, PLEASE MAKE A LEAD FREE PRODUCT AND OFFER A RECALL.  STANDBY YOUR NON-TOXIC, LEAD FREE CLAIMS.

Please share this far and wide.  Caregivers of children using these types of water bottles need to be made aware.  Adults shouldn’t have this exposure either but children can be affected more by lead.

 

If you would like to reach out to the companies above to share your concerns, below is their contact information:

PlanetBox – info@planetbox.com or (844) 752-6388 (Planet8)

Pura Kiki – cs@purastainless.com or (805) 884-0313

Healthy Human – You can contact them at this link.

Eco Vessel – info@ecovessel.com or 800-969-2962

 

If you have a water bottle like this and want to share a picture in the comments please do!  If you can’t post a picture please feel free to email me at naturalbabymama@hotmail.com.  The more awareness around this the better.

Important Note:

Each of these tests were done on one water bottle from each of the companies above.  These tests were done by someone certified to test items for lead with an XRF.  This was not done in a lab.  If these companies want to test the water bottles we tested at a third party lab, the owner’s of these bottles would happily send to a third party lab for testing.

 

FAQ:

 

What about Hydroflask?

They had the exact same issue happen a few years back.  They change their manufacturing and now state it is lead free; however, since I did not test it I am not including it in my recommended bottles above.  You will want to find out if you are using an older bottle or not especially if the solder is exposed.

What about Thermos Funtainer?

There have been so many questions about this particular brand I’ll do some research into it.  However, reading through the comments someone posted a response from Thermos that did not say they were lead free.  They said that there is no risk of lead exposure.  Several other people commented that under several layers on the bottom there seems to be a black dot.  So without testing there is no way to know.  It seems fairly contained in if everything is in place; however, I have a no lead in my children’s toys, cups, or plates policy (well really anywhere but these are the big ones).  Update:  Thermos stated in response to a twitter comment that their solder is lead free.  I still have not testing and don’t plan on taking apart a sealed bottle to do so.

Have you tested X, Y or Z brand?  So many different brands that I’m using X, Y and Z to be generic.

I’m getting lot of questions about other water bottle brands.  What I have posted above is what I have tested (or readers have sent in).  I have no information on other brands without testing them.

The bottom of my water bottle came off, should I be concerned?

Please contact the company and discuss a replacement option.  The bottles were not made to have pieces missing.  I would not use if a protective cap on the bottom was missing.

Am I going to test any more brands?

I might at some point, but right now I don’t have any plans to.  My plan is to hopefully get enough exposure that industry wide change made.  Clearly this isn’t an isolated incident with a few companies.  It is a manufacturing process to seal the insulation.  Companies claiming third party testing that it is lead free when it is not lead free.

Company X, Y, Z is telling me they have third party testing saying it is safe.  Why is this happening?

You can ask how often companies test their products.  You can ask if it is 100% lead free.  You can ask to see the results.  From what I have found, not just with these water bottles but other products as well, is that testing is not done consistently enough.  Let’s say they test a batch then they don’t test again for another year or two or more.  You, and they, have no way of knowing that the current batch is the same as the batch they tested.  This is consistently a problem with items made overseas (especially in China).   I have found some companies that test each batch of raw material because while they trust their supplies they don’t feel like they can rely on trust.  On the other hand a lot of companies test in the beginning of a relationship with a supplier and then do rely on trust.  Shortcuts may happen that the company is not aware of.  This is why I have a strict policy about products I buy for my family.

What is this lead dot used for?

To seal the insulated water bottle they are use lead solder.  Non insulated water bottles should not have a lead dot on the bottom.

Does the stainless steel have lead in it?

No, it is purely the lead solder used to seal and vacuum in the insulated feature of the water bottle.

 

Check out Natural Baby Mama in the news with info related to this post.

 

This post will be updated as new information becomes available!

 

Other posts you might find interesting:

Green Sprouts sippy cup tests positive for lead

Testing my stuff to lead 

Non-Toxic Toys

Non-Toxic Dishes

Water filter recommendations

 

Are you concerned about toxins in other consumer goods?

Check out my change.org petition to remove toxic chemicals from car seats.

 

Disclaimer:  I use affiliate links at times. It doesn’t cost you any more but does help support my time running my blog and this page. Other affiliate links might get you a discount which is a win, win! I appreciate you supporting my links as a way to help me offset my time by bringing info to you. I will never be swayed financially, and I will only post products and companies that I would, and do, personally use for my family.

 

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Comments 193

  1. Ugh!! So frustrating that this are not as advertised. I choose stainless steel to avoid toxins only to find more! Companies really need to rectify this.

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      1. Why would that dot contain lead and the rest of the product not? They use a different substance to seal the hole than what the surrounding cup is made of?

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  2. This is Caroline Miros, Founder of PlanetBox writing. Thank you so much for reaching out to us about your concern with the spot on the bottom of our water bottles. We have just received word of this, and want you to know that we absolutely take this issue very seriously. We do test our products for lead (and other toxins as well). The very reason my husband and I created this business and our products is to offer safe products for both kids and adults.

    Right now we are working non-stop to do more research on this. And we have taken our bottles off the market in the meantime as a precautionary step. We respectfully ask for your patience while we gather the necessary data. We hope to very quickly identify any hazards, and make a plan for any necessary steps to return, replace or repair any potentially unsafe products. This would of course include notification of our corrective actions to customers who have bottles.

    Thank you again for bringing this to my attention. Please know we take this very seriously, and will be researching further and taking the necessary steps to make this right going forward, both for our current and future customers.

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      Thank you Caroline! Please keep us posted as we would all love to know more answers. Specifically why is lead being used when your product is stated as lead free? Going forward will you have a lead free alternative? Last, will you be offering a recall of all affected water bottles? Thank you for taking the time to reach out and let everyone that you are researching this further.

      1. Hi, I have the planet box lunch box, have those been tested? If there is an issue with their water bottles should I be concerned about the lunch box?

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  3. So the new Pura Kiki bottles do not have this lead dot??? Very concerned because these are the bottles I bought for my 5 month old… I was trying to avoid toxins… smh

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      I would not be concerned if they look like the picture of the new insulated bottles I have posted above. .

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          This is a personal choice. In my house, and for my kids, I would not use it. It’s hard to quantify what the risk might be. I would email them and ask for a replacement for a new bottle.

      1. What is it that leads you to believe that stainless steel bottles offer no harm due to heavy metal migration/leaching?

        let me guess: these company’s offering 3rd party testing assurances… just like the assurances you list saying no lead…?? this is most honestly called profit driven marketing corporate-speak = greenwash

        Do realize these “green” “eco” (which means home not China) “family-owned” blah blah blah etc etc are making millions, and even tens of millions, and even more than 50 million dollars a year. Trust your own innate sensibilities, not these heartless alternative facts.

        if you do the research, you will find that Chinese stainless steel bottles (especially when having exposed inner welds –which most do) are migrating/leaching hazardous heavy metals such as chromium, nickel, manganese and more. The science community is finally coming around to looking more closely at this… expect the reports over the next year or so to disrupt their greenwashed profiteering.

        and remember, studies showing results of testing stainless cookware do not equate to bottles which can not be passivated in the same way, additionally quality stainless cookware is 18-10 / 316 surgical grade (read expensive)… Cheap chinese 18-8/304 is what all stainless steel bottles are made of

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          Your response is interesting to me. I didn’t comment about leaching of metals with stainless steel. You can read what I wrote in my pots & pans post here specifically about stainless steel http://thenaturalbabymama.com/your-home/non-toxic-pots-pans/.

          I was specifically answering about the lead “dot” solder to the person above. That lead in on the outside, not the inside of the bottle.

          As for third party testing, I’ve made comments about this, including in this post. The reason why I test my own goods occasionally is because I don’t trust third party testing. I trust those results at that moment but continued testing is hard to come by. Companies test so infrequently it’s scary – many years pass by. I rarely buy goods from companies made in China. For example, I buy my kids natural rubber boots from a company that makes them in China because there is no natural rubber boot company that makes them outside of China. The company I buy from tests EACH batch of raw material. I’ve also tested their boots 3 different times over 4 years.

          You are preaching to the choir over here. I really appreciate knowing that other people are as concerned & aware as I am. Thanks for your comment.

  4. I’m a little confused about Pura Kiki. Are the new products absolutely lead free or have they just done a better job at sealing in that lead dot?

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      They have third party testing showing lead free. However, I believe that all the brands were under the assumption that they were lead free previously as well. I’m sure Pura will be releasing a statement in the coming days.

  5. This is absolutely awful. I planned on buying one of these water bottles NO MORE and such a shame that these are considered “eco friendly” companies..

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      I would think those would be fine. The issue really is just around the dot on the bottom which is used to seal the insulated ones.

  6. I also wondered about Hydroflask. My entire family uses these and I am interested in seeing how they test. Any information would be wonderful.

  7. Thank you, Caroline, for your response. We’ve stopped using the plastic covers on our kids’ Planetbox bottles because they keep falling off.

  8. Well I just tossed my daughters favourite bottle in the garbage. I’m wondering if by chance you tested the Planet Box lunch kits? The first thing my husband asked when I mentioned the water bottle was what about the lunch kit.

    It’s beyond devastating reading about that dot, I remember back in the summer when the bottom was off for a few days, seeing my daughter run her finger across and ask why theres a mark there.

    1. I’m wondering about the Planet Box lunch box myself! We use the Rover style and one of the main reasons we purchased was to avoid harmful toxins.

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        This only had to do with insulated water bottles and the sealing of that insulation. The stainless steel itself was fine so your lunch box should be fine 🙂

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          So it’s just specific to insulated water bottles and not other stainless products they or others make.

  9. I just recently purchased Pura Kiki bottles for my one year old and they do not have the dot on the bottom but they do not look like the insulated one in the photo that was shared. Should I continue to use these? They do not have the band around the bottom either like the insulated ones.

    Ugh! I thought I could trust this company!

  10. My question……is the lead getting into the water or is it from touching the bottom where that dot is? My husband, 6 year old daughter & I all have our own Hydroflask and I see a dot & no seams so this is concerning to me. And if it is just from touching the dot on the bottom, would putting a couple pieces of duct tape over it help?

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  11. The hydroflask bottles that are painted don’t have a dot at the bottum. So no problem there. However the brushes stainless steel one does and so does the bottle from thinksport. Do all of the insulated bottles that have the dot have a risk of containing lead?

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      They have to seal it with something and it looks like a lot of companies are using a lead solder. It doesn’t mean that all do. Is the dot exposed on your thinksport? If so, I updated the post with more info on how you can test at home.

  12. Have you tested the Thermos brand. My daughter has been using it and few months ago the rubber at bottom fell off. I’ve checked it after reading the this article and found out that there’s a whole bunch of ‘glue’ and a dot in the middle. This is alarming. Since most of these stainless steel insulated water bottles are advertised as lead free. That’s why parents buy them, because they want safer things for their children.

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  13. Hi Caroline. This is very concerning if found to be true. If so, I expect a full refund for the two water bottles I purchased. I spent more than $200 for both my kids to have a lunch box with all of your accessories! The point of your product is to be environmentally safe, and obviously safe for our kids…so I am hoping this is not true.

  14. Glad to see Kleen Canteen on here, is it safe to assume past years are also lead free?? Thanks so much for your contribution 🙂

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      That’s hard to say but I would say if it looks similar to the one I posted I would feel comfortable using it.

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        What does the bottom of the bottle look like? I’ve updated the post with a FAQ section at the bottom of the page.

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      What does the bottom of the bottle look like? I’ve updated the post with a FAQ section at the bottom of the page.

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  15. So…what about the bottles that are not one piece? For example the Funtainer kids brand bottles that are sold at most stores have a seem on the inside? Are those interior seams sealed with lead?

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  16. We have three of the Planetbox water bottles, including one of the larger ones that have no plastic cover. My son drinks from this every day! We also run it through the dishwasher every day, and I wonder if that is spreading the lead around?

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  17. I’m also confused if it’s in the water or only when touching the bottom (still concerning!). We’re also concerned about the Hydroflask, I have that one but luckily my children have the klean kanteens. Thank you for this discovery!

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      Just touching the bottom. Not inside where the water is. I’ve updated the post with a FAQ section at the bottom of the page which discusses Hydroflask.

  18. Any idea how the Thermos Funtainer insulted bottles are made? They have a plastic base on outside of bottle. Could that be hiding the lead dot? And if so – is it still safe to use for my toddler?

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  19. A small correction on the info given about Pura Kiki with the silicone tops. Silicone is a plastic, or more accurately, a synthetic polymer. It is considered a safer plastic, but we can’t call this plastic-free.

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      I would love to hear more about this because Pura calls themselves plastic free and I’ve always thought of silicone more in the rubber family that plastic family.

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  20. What about the thermos stainless steel water bottles everyone buys in Target, Toys R Us, etc? They have the silicone spout too. My daughter has several and uses them ALL DAY in school! They cannot take glass. I tore the plastic covering off the bottom of one and looked, there was some type of yellow insulating material like a caulking of some kind but it was covering up that black dot! I’m terrified and don’t know how to test the bottles for lead! Help!

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      I’ve updated the post with a FAQ section at the bottom of the page. I would recommend not tearing it apart looking for lead. You would rather not expose it if at all possible. If you have exposed it my post will show you how to test it at home. If you do test it can you email me your results to naturalbabymama@hotmail.com

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      What does the bottom of the bottle look like? I’ve updated the post with a FAQ section at the bottom of the page.

  21. Does anyone know about the Takeya brand of stainless steel water bottles? they have a spot on the bottom of the ones that are not colored. The ones that are colored are all the same color from top to bottom.

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  22. We have two non insulated stainless steel water bottles from Planet Box and they both also have a black dot on the bottom that looks like the one in the photo you posted above. My son uses (used) them daily. :/

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      What does the bottom of the bottle look like? I’ve updated the post with a FAQ section at the bottom of the page.

  23. Hi there,

    I see a few people have asked if the Thermos Funtainer insulated drink bottle is safe and there has been no response.
    Can u please let us know if it’s safe or not.

    Thank you

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  24. Hi there,
    This really makes me angry. I can’t believe these companies are getting away with false advertising. Can u pls tell me is Thermos Funtainer insulated drink bottle safe? Thx u

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      What does the bottom of the bottle look like? I’ve updated the post with a FAQ section at the bottom of the page.

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      What does the bottom of the bottle look like? I’ve updated the post with a FAQ section at the bottom of the page.

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      What does the bottom of the bottle look like? I’ve updated the post with a FAQ section at the bottom of the page.

      Also, see another comment where Thermos made a comment about lead in their products.

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      What does the bottom of the bottle look like? I’ve updated the post with a FAQ section at the bottom of the page.

  25. I’m also wondering about the Thermos Funtainer stainless steel cups. Have those been tested? My kids drink from them every day because I thought they were a safe alternative to plastic.

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      What does the bottom of the bottle look like? I’ve updated the post with a FAQ section at the bottom of the page.

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      What does the bottom of the bottle look like? I’ve updated the post with a FAQ section at the bottom of the page.

  26. This is what Thermos told me regarding the Funtainer:

    > This is in response to your recent inquiry regarding your Thermos. All
    > Thermos products are subjected to rigorous testing by independent
    > testing laboratories. As a result of this testing, we can assure you
    > that Thermos products pose no risk of lead exposure to consumers.
    >
    > Cordially,
    > Alissa Walker
    > Consumer Service | O: 800.831.9242
    > Thermos L.L.C.
    > 355 Thermos Road
    > Batesville, MS 38606

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      Pose no risk of lead exposure. So they are using lead then? They are not saying they are lead free. I would write back and ask them where the lead is in their product and what level.

    2. If you write back will you ask, “what about if the bottom plastic piece falls off?” I may email them myself. How frustrating and sad!

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      What does the bottom of the bottle look like? I’ve updated the post with a FAQ section at the bottom of the page.

  27. My wife forwarded me this article in an alarmed state and asked me to do some research. I am PHD graduate working in the mechanical engineering industry. My family has been using stainless steel bottles for many years. We believe that plastics are detriment to health.

    I did some research and found that all vacuum insulated products are manufactured using the same process. This includes bottles, tumblers & mugs – anything with two layers. There needs to be a way to effectively seal the vacuum. The vacuum prevents heat / cold from escaping maintaining the liquid temperature. The seal used to create the vacuum does not touch any liquid.

    We are a family of four that use different brands. My wife has too many Swell bottles. I have a two Hydro Flasks and my kids have Takeya and Thermos bottles. My parents have used a Stanley flask for years. The Swell and Stanley has bases at the bottom and the Hydro Flask, Takeya and Thermos do not. They are all painted either with patterns or solid colors. The article admits that the XRF scanner may not penetrate through paint and stainless steel – and also how far it can read through steel – so even if you have a Yeti or Klean Kanteen / other brand with a base – any reading may not be able to be correctly read by a XRF scanner.

    I know that some of these brands are global companies with sales in the multi millions. They are sold in large big box US retailers including Dicks, Target and Walmart. Thermos has been around for over 100 years. I’m confident they are not manufacturing their products without using independent laboratory testing processes that are based upon multiple testing scenarios. In my field we use multiple tests – this is much more than a scanner that may or may not provide accurate results.

    We are continuing to use our stainless steel bottles. I consider them much safer than plastic.

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      Actually my post states that an XRF CAN penetrate through paint. That is the entire point of an XRF. It is used often in old homes where lead paint may be under layers of newer paint. I was told by the woman testing my goods that it could penetrate through stainless steel. I just didn’t state that as a fact because I’m not a certified lab and don’t want to make claims that it can go through steel and / or how far through it can go. There are some metals it can not go very far through.

      All of these companies have third party tests showing that they are lead free; however, lead has been detected not only by the testing that we just did but my readers who are testing their water bottles at home with lead test swabs. Hydro Flask had this same issue a few years back where lead was found – you can easily google it. The issue isn’t around their third party testing but the lack on continued testing which is a huge concern especially for goods being made in China. The CPSC routinely uses the exact same XRF we used, as well as other methods at times as well, to test consumer goods. Do some research on an XRF, it’s not a scanner. An XRF is providing accurate results. The exposed dot is lead and the Healthy Human had lead under the paint. Please let me know if you have other questions.

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        Also, to follow up, just wanted to make sure you read this post fully and are clear about what is going on. This has nothing to do with the stainless but everything to do with how the insulated bottles are sealed. Companies are using lead solder when stating that they are lead free. As you can see from the pictures, several brands have exposed lead which is a huge risk and concern for not only children but adults. I’m not sure where you going with the plastic as I don’t state anywhere to use plastic. I don’t use plastic in my own home. I gave recommendations for stainless steel insulated water bottles that were free from lead solder in the recommended bottles.

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      What does the bottom of the bottle look like? I’ve updated the post with a FAQ section at the bottom of the page.

  28. Any research on the Safe Sporter water bottles? Also we have the Pura Kiki non insulated bottles with the silicone sleeve on it. They don’t appear to have a dot but I just want to be sure I’m using a safe product! Thank you!

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      Yes, the non insulated should not have a dot as they are not sealing anything. I haven’t done any research on the Safe Sporter. I’ve updated the post with a FAQ section at the bottom of the page.

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      No I did not test all insulated models. As I stated in my post I tested the exact one I linked and showed a picture of.

  29. I would also really love to know about the Thermos Stainless Steel water bottles. Both my kids use them and I am now very concerned.

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      What does the bottom of the bottle look like? I’ve updated the post with a FAQ section at the bottom of the page.

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      Author

      What does the bottom of the bottle look like? I’ve updated the post with a FAQ section at the bottom of the page.

  30. Just sent pura an email with the picture of my 3 Pura Kiki bottles, 1 with the “protective lead covering” missing, not sure how long it has been missing, never noticed. The other two bottles with the intact covering seem like they could fall off any day.. Been using these with my son since he was 1 month old. Very disappointed and a little worried. Thank you for exposing this.

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      You can test it with a 3M home test swab. I’m updating the post with info on how to test. It’s inexpensive and you can just swab over it and it will let you know if there is lead or not. Keep your bottles even if they do test positive. Message me with the results if you test please!

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      Thank you for getting in contact with them. I’ve heard that the protective covering comes off often sadly. Hopefully they offer you a replacement for all your bottles with one of their insulated bottles that I posted as recommended.

  31. Thank you for this information. My son has a Pura insulated bottle, but it is the larger size. I see on the bottom of it that there is a large stainless steel circle, not like the dot shown in the Kiki with lead here. Glad to know Pura has solved the problem!

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      So the dot on the Pura shown above was suppose to have that stainless circle over the top of it. How old is your bottle? There is a chance it could have lead solder under it, no way of telling without testing though.

  32. Also looking at any info regarding Contigo. It is painted blue and decorated like a shark and has a black dot on the bottom. It has “2014 Ignite USA” printed on the bottom.

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      Does the dot look like the dot in the orange water bottle on my post? There is no way to know without testing it.

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      Yes, I updated my post with some FAQ and I addressed Hydroflask. They had this same issue in the past so I guess it would depend on how old your water bottle is.

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      This has to do with how the insulated bottles are sealed. You will need to look at the bottom of your mug if you are using an insulated mug.

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      Author

      What does the bottom of the bottle look like? I’ve updated the post with a FAQ section at the bottom of the page.

  33. We have a water bottle bottle as well as a planetbox lunchbox… which we use almost every day. Are the luck boxes free of lead ?

    Thank you ,

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      The issue is with the sealing of the insulated water bottles and using lead to seal it, not with the stainless itself. I’ve updated the post with a FAQ section at the bottom.

  34. OMG it never occurred to me, my daughter has a cheap stainless bottle from CottonOn I’m tipping it isn’t safe! I have a 360 degrees insulated stainless steel water bottle, have you heard of them? Freaking out! Wish we all had access to test for things like this.

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  35. Did you test the newer, non-insulated model of the Pura Kika or are you just going off of their third party testing? I’m concerned and need to know what to feed my son out of before my 3m lead tests arrive in the mail!

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      This issue seems to be only with the insulated water bottles. If you don’t have a dot on the bottom of your water bottle it shouldn’t be a concern.

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  36. I just bought my son an Eco Vessel with a fox on it. It doesn’t have a dot on the bottom, but the bottom does indent in. I got it from Amazon. Would this have lead?

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  37. I just heard back from Planet Box. Because their bottles fall within federal guidelines for heavy metal content, they are taking no action on the matter. Apparently, it doesn’t matter to them that they marketed their bottles as being lead safe and people paid a premium for that knowledge and peace of mind. I find this highly disappointing. I forwarded you photos of our non-insulated Planet Box bottles with the same lead dots on the bottom. I also forwarded you their reply to my email stating that they are taking no action re: the concentrated lead surface on the bottom of their bottles. I hope you will consider posting both! Thanks!

  38. The 18.8oz planet box water bottles do NOT even have a plastic covering for the bottom and the dot is fully exposed. Glad I paid a “trusted” company an over ridiculous amount for a product that was suppose to be safe for my children and could be poisoning them.

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      1. This is one of the ones we have as well. I sent you photos earlier. We own both of the water bottles Planet Box is currently selling. We bought them a few months ago. Neither bottle is insulated. Both have the black dots on the bottom. One bottle comes with a removable plastic cover for the bottom. The second bottle has not cover for the bottom, so the black dot is exposed.

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  39. We have a thermos funtainer with the bottom broken off, and it appears to me like it was soldered (probably with lead). So infuriating. I’m going to order a test kit now and will update you when I have results. Thank you for this post.

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  40. Just tested the dot on our Pura Kiki and it also tested positive for lead. We will have the lead blood level results tomorrow as well. I have pictures of the bottle and test results and a video of us doing the lead test. I sent you an email earlier as well.

  41. Hey! Hydro Flasks actually DO NOT contain lead at all.
    I called, and they use a glass frit.
    If you’re super worried about your flask containing lead, they WILL REPLACE IT FOR YOU.

    They do not use stainless steel from China, hence NO LEAD AT ALL.

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  42. I contacted Eco Vessel directly. Please make sure you do your research before posting such things. We as parents only want what’s best for our children and certainly do not want to poison them with such toxic chemicals. However if you are using old products that aren’t even sold and testing them make sure you state those thing in your post. As well as the fact that you are not a lab. Scare tactics are not appreciated. Facts are. I will continue to support Eco Vessel and it’s fantastic products.

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      Did you read my post? It states all the things you mention above. There are no scare tactics, just what is actually happening out there. If you had read my post you would realize that this was sent in by a reader and I didn’t test it myself. You are correct facts are facts. That is what I stated in my post – facts/

  43. Did we ever find out about Takeya? I have two and I’m a little worried, I would switch to glass but I need a larger bottle and can’t find a good glass one over 40 oz.

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    1. This is the response I got from pura kiki. I just purchased the pura kiki swirl new model insulated bottles.

      Hi,

      Thank you for the note. The issue in question is under investigation. ​We recently received a report from a consumer who ​tested the solder point located on the exterior base of a discontinued version of our 9oz insulated bottle. When the bottle was manufactured and before it was sold, the solder point was covered by a stainless steel cover​ that is adhered to the base of the bottle during the manufacturing process (and is not intended to ever be removed from the bottle) and was independently tested to be lead-free. T​he customer that reported a positive result for lead informed us that the metal disk had been removed or fallen off from the bottom of the bottle before she tested it.

      Your bottle uses an updated design which employs an improved two-piece base design (as seen by the small seam near the base of the bottle) and does not include an exterior solder dot. These are not under investigation and have passed all past third parting testing.

      We have always, and will continue to test our products.

      To explain our testing, all our products, whether designed for children or adults, comply with CPSIA (USA regulation for children’s products) and the European Union Children’s Drinking Equipment regulations (which are much stricter than the US Rules) and Cal 65 (additional lead testing required by the State of California). We use third parting testing labs, additional material testing during the manufacturing process, and finished production testing on each run. Each regulation has an allowed lead limit. However, our products have always received “none detectable” results.

      Best Regards,
      The Pura Stainless Team​

      CS:jm​

      *PLEASE NOTE: We do not handle international warranty requests and do not ship internationally. Please contact the distributor in your region for assistance.

      Sign up to receive information on new products and coupon codes by clicking here: Add Me!
      We send fewer than one e-mail per month. Only people on our e-mail list receive our coupon codes.
      ________________________________
      The Pura® Story
      Pura was conceived with a simple notion… to provide the safest and most adaptable juvenile feeding and adult hydration solutions to consumers around the world. Currently we offer the only 100% plastic free infant and toddler bottles in the world. Our Kiki line is crafted from only food grade stainless steel and medical grade silicone …because what is the point of drinking from a non-plastic bottle if you are still drinking through a plastic spout or plastic straw?

      We are proud to combine market-changing innovation with an award winning eco-progressive business model. Most importantly, we remain a family-owned business with an eye on continuous innovation and an unparalleled focus on quality. We offer only the best for you and your loved ones… One Life… One Bottle™

      One Life, One Bottle
      http://www.PuraStainless.com
      (805) 884-0313

  44. We have two Takeya 40oz purchased at Costco in a set – one fully painted and one bare stainless with exposed solder dot.

    Tonight I tested the bare dot with a 3M lead check stick which turned dark red indicating the presence of lead.

    I will be returning these to Costco, and informing Takeya and the CPSC.

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      Thank you! I would consider keeping them incase the CPSC needs them for any reason. You can return after they have investigated it.

    2. Here’s Takeya’s response:

      The Thermoflask is a double-walled vacuum sealed stainless steel container. The inner portion of the Thermoflask is made from a one-piece stainless steel sheet that is not sealed with any material containing lead. The outer portion of the vessel is approximately one-half inch away from the inner surface and forms the space that allows the creation of a vacuum, which is what provides the superior insulating qualities. Once a vacuum is created between the two layers, the pin hole at the bottom of the outer layer of stainless steel, which allows the air to be extracted to create the vacuum, is sealed. This is done by applying a seal, that does contain lead, which is heated, melts and then solidifies when it cools. There is no contact whatsoever between the contents of the Thermoflask, whether it is water or another drink, and the seal. This is because there is both a half-inch vacuum space and a layer of stainless steel between the seal and the contents. On all of the powder coated Thermoflasks, the seal is covered. On the non-powder coated Thermoflasks, the seal is visible.

      Our Thermoflasks have been rigorously tested for many characteristics, including lead. To determine whether any prohibited lead surface contamination exists, a Wipe Test for California Proposition 65 was performed by an independent certified laboratory using NIOSH Method 9100 (Lead in Surface Wipe Samples and analyzed by Atomic Absorption Spectrometer). The results of this testing indicate that the surface contains no detectable lead. The actual test result was reported as “less than 0.5ppm,” which is the lower limit of the test’s limit of detection. These results pass the applicable regulatory standards set for lead and indicate that the Thermoflask poses no health hazard.

      1. The wipe test for which Takeya is claiming their product poses no health risks is a very isolated, controlled condition, where the bottle is tested once when new.

        It does not account for conditions where the bottle abrades any number of surfaces during normal usage. Our painted Hydroflask and Takeya water bottles have paint chipped and wearing off the bottom. To me this indicates the lead dot of the bare stainless bottle is also exposed to the same use and could possibly transfer to other surfaces.

  45. Are all of the Klean kanteen bottles safe? The kids ones don’t have a dot the bottom, but on our older ones the paint on the outside of the bottle is starting to chip.

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      If there is a dot on the bottom I would assume lead solder unless tested otherwise – regardless of brand. If it is exposed I would not use without testing.

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  46. Well, very curious as to what you think about stainless steel in general now. One of the comments above brought up concerns over the seams that some bottles have. Also mentioned that the steel used is all from the cheaper mix of st. steel. Have you done any research on either of those issues? Thanks!!!

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      I’m very torn on stainless steel in general. I think for water it is probably ok. For something acidic I am very leery. I also wouldn’t buy a bottle with a seam. There are plenty of stainless steel bottles without seams.

      1. Well, it seems that all of our bottles, contigo and others, have seams. Since this is something you have spent a lot of time on, can you list some brands that you know offer some with seams? I realize that the purpose of your article was something else…but I think it’s worth being careful about. ; ) Thanks so much.

  47. I bought some stainless steel cups from crate and barrel. Expresso mugs for my son. Does this mean all stainless steel items are potentially unsafe?

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  48. What about Kakai water bottles? Have those been tested. I absolutely love mine – it keeps the water cold for days. Kids don’t use it – but I am worried about my own health in using it. It does have a dot on the bottom.

  49. I confirmed with Planetbox that the base was removable. This was the reason I purchased it. Emails from last year instruct me on how to take the base off and how all parts of the bottle can be disassembled to wash thoroughly, with base detached or attached from flask. In fact, there was some grease right on that lead dot and they told me to wash with soap and water and if that didnt work to make a paste and scrub with my sponge. I did all that AND used my fingernail to try and get that grease off…which in the end was the grease and lead dot. Also, at the time of purchase, the bottle was certified lead free by a 3rd party. As many of you have found, all that wording has now been changed to say that base should not be detached and that the bottle is lead safe.

    I reached out to PlanetBox 12/2016 to find out if the Booster 18.8oz bottle base was same as the Capsule base. At that time, I asked PlanetBox for heavy metal testing results from third party but they declined because it includes proprietary information about their products. In Feb. the owner sent me a report from Intertek showing the bottle passed lead testing. No proprietary information is on report. This report can also be viewed in the statement they have made on their website.

    These inconsistencies are troubling. I purchased this item after so much research – trusted the 3rd party testing and the mission statement that the former childhood lead prevention worker shared about her company. The families reading the information on this blog and in similar groups are lucky to be informed of this development. But what about the other families whose children are still using this water bottle. The countless families I have shared this product with. How will they get the information?

    That’s awesome that Planetbox will be changing their bottles but what about the bad bottles that are out there now? The responsible and admirable thing to do is to issue a recall. Planetbox has already tested and admitted to the bottles containing lead. So issue the recall and be a hero.

  50. Contigo stainless insulated water bottles have this dot!! I have contacted customer care and they asked me to pay to test it for lead myself. I told them this is their issue and should be resolved at their own expense. I have not heard back and I plan on returning the bottle to Target. I just emailed again hoping to get a response or an update on the issue.

  51. Pingback: Lead In Stainless Steel Water Bottles - Raising Natural Kids

  52. Pura is offering to replace my 3 bottles, but I have to send them back to them first and then they will send me the new ones, which I find interesting. I am going to test them for lead first. I find it concerning that they still have not released anything about this to the public, only saying in their email that it is still under investigation. While there are probably thousands of people still using their older, discontinued bottles.

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  53. After reading this article, my Thermos Foogo, that’s an older version of the Funtainers (As I understand it) fell apart. The plastic bottom came loose and broke off exposing a lead looking dot at the bottom. I have not tested but felt I should dispose of it. I wasn’t sure if tossing it in the trash would be appropriate so I contacted Thermos customer service. They responded quickly with an email noting warranty and replacement of defective products. They are asking me to send the product back if my “issue is listed as being covered under warranty”. Wondering if they’re just trying to get the product back. Anyone have any experience with this?

  54. I have a much loved and used for over 10 years, stainless steel water bottle. It is not insulate and consists of only one layer of staineless steel. I’m not sure how it was formed or shaped. There is not dot/soldering/lead dot on the bottom either inside or outside. How can I test/know that this bottle is safe. I do have ongoing issues with mercury and lead being elevated to the point of major concern. I’m on a chelating regime using Por-porazyme. I’d rather not add to the problem. I’ve checked this bottle thoroughly and I cannot see any sign of a solder….anywhere. How can I confirm my bottle is safe? The markings on the bottom say “Stainless Steel h2go TM”. TIA for any information you may be able to direct me to or testing.

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      The lead solder is used specifically in the insulated bottles to seal the hole at the base. Non-insulated don’t need to use a solder. Without seeing or knowing your bottle my guess is there is no hole to seal. If you wanted to test it you could but it seems like it would be fine. I really like Life Factory glass bottles so I don’t have to worry about it 🙂

  55. I like the design of PlanetBox water bottle a lot but I didn’t buy it after I read this news. They removed the bottles from the website for a while and now they are back. I tried to emailed couple of times their customer service but no reply from them( maybe that says a lot too about how serious and trusted they are or not).
    Anyhow, does anybody knows more info about PlanetBox stainless steel water bottles, if they fix the lead issue found? And if they guarantee 100% lead free now including the solder dot for insulation?

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      They are not lead free. They are working on making a bottom that is not removable so the lead is not exposed. They did testing and confirmed that there is lead. They will not be recalling existing bottles just making the change for new customers. That’s too bad their customer service isn’t emailing you back!

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